Monday, November 30, 2015

List of Favorite Movie and Television Productions About the HOLOCAUST

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Below is a list of my favorite movie and television productions about the Holocaust released in chronological order: 



LIST OF FAVORITE MOVIE AND TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST

1 - The Search

"The Search" (1948) - Fred Zinneman directed this Oscar winning movie about a young Auschwitz survivor and his mother who search for each other across post-World War II Europe. Oscar nominee Montgomery Clift and Oscar winner 
Ivan Jandl starred.




2 - The Diary of Anne Frank

"The Diary of Anne Frank" (1959) - George Stevens directed this adaptation of the Broadway play about Holocaust victim Anne Frank, her family and their friends hiding in an attic in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. The movie starred Millie Perkins, Joseph Schildkraut and Oscar winner Shelley Winters.




3 - Judgment at Nuremberg

"Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961) - Stanley Kramer directed this Oscar winner about an American military tribunal in post-war occupied Germany that tries four Nazi judges for war crimes. Oscar nominee Spencer Tracy, Marlene Dietrich and Oscar winner Maximilian Schell starred.




4 - Marathon Man

"Marathon Man" (1976) - Dustin Hoffman, Oscar nominee Laurence Olivier and Roy Schneider starred in this adaptation of William Goldman's 1974 novel about a history graduate student caught up in a conspiracy regarding stolen diamonds, a Nazi war criminal and a rogue government agent. John Schlesinger directed.




5 - Voyage of the Damned

"Voyage of the Damned" (1976) - Faye Dunaway and Max von Sydow starred in this adaptation of Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan-Witts' 1974 book about the fate of the MS St. Louis ocean liner carrying Jewish refugees from Germany to Cuba in 1939. Stuart Rosenberg directed.




6 - Holocaust

"Holocaust" (1978) - Gerald Green wrote and produced this Emmy winning miniseries about the experiences of a German Jewish family and a rising member of the SS during World War II. Fritz Weaver, Rosemary Harris and Emmy winners Meryl Streep and Michael Moriarty starred.




7 - Sophie Choice

"Sophie’s Choice" (1982) - Oscar winner Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline and Peter MacNicol starred in this adaptation of William Styron's 1979 novel about an American writer's acquaintance with a Polish immigrant and Holocaust survivor in post-World War II New York City. The movie was directed by Alan J. Pakula.




8 - Escape From Sobibor

"Escape From Sobibor" (1987) - Alan Arkin, Joanna Paula and Golden Globe winner Rutger Hauer starred in this television movie about the mass escape of Jewish prisoners from the Nazi extermination camp at Sobibor in 1943. Jack Gold directed.




9 - War and Remembrance

"War and Remembrance" (1988) - Dan Curtis produced, directed and co-wrote this Emmy winning television adaptation of Herman Wouk's 1978 novel about the experiences of a naval family and their in-laws during World War II. Robert Mitchum, Jane Seymour, Hart Bochner and John Gielgud starred.




10 - Schindlers List

"Schindler’s List" (1993) - Steven Spielberg produced and directed this Oscar winning adaptation of Thomas Keneally's 1982 novel,"Schindler's Ark" about Nazi party member and businessman, Oscar Schindler, who helped saved many Polish-Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. The movie starred Oscar nominees Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes and Ben Kingsley. 



11 - Life Is Beautiful

"Life Is Beautiful" (1997) - Oscar winner Roberto Benigni starred, directed and co-wrote this Academy Award winning film about a Jewish-Italian book shop owner, who uses his imagination to shield his son from the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp. The movie co-starred Nicoletta Braschi and Giorgio Cantarini.




12 - The Pianist

"The Pianist" (2002) - Roman Polanski directed this Oscar winning adaptation of Polish-Jewish pianist Wladyslaw Szpilman's World War Ii memoirs. Oscar winner Adrien Brody and Thomas Kretschmann starred.




13 - Black Book

"Black Book" (2006) - Paul Verhoeven directed World War II tale about a Dutch-Jewish woman who becomes a spy for the Resistance after a tragic encounter with the Nazis. Carice van Houten and Sebastian Koch starred.




14 - The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

"The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas" (2008) - Asa Butterfield, Jack Scanlon, Vera Fermiga and David Thewlis starred in this adaptation of John Boyne's 2006 novel about a friendship between two eight year-olds - the son of an extermination camp commandant and a young Jewish inmate. Mark Herman directed. 






"Inglourious Basterds" (2009) - Quentin Tarantino wrote and directed this Oscar winning alternate-history tale about two separate plots to assassinate Nazi Germany's high political leadership at a film premiere in Nazi occupied Paris. The movie starred Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent and Oscar winner Christoph Waltz.

Saturday, November 28, 2015

"SERENA" (2014) Review



(This review features spoilers of the 2014 movie, "SERENA" and the Ron Rash 2008 novel from which it is adapted. If you have not seen the movie or read the novel, I suggest you do not read this review.) 


"SERENA" (2014) Review

Seven years ago, author Ron Rash wrote a novel about a young socialite's effect upon the lives of her new husband, their North Carolina timber business and the Appalachian community that relied upon it during the early years of the Great Depression. The cinematic adaptation of Rash's novel hung around development for a while, before it finally became the 2014 movie, "SERENA"

"SERENA" begins during the late fall of 1929, when the New England-born timber tycoon, George Pemberton, is forced to travel to Boston and secure more funds for his lumber business in western North Carolina. While attending a horse show with his sister, George meets Serena, the daughter of a businessman who had owned his own lumber business in Colorado. After a quick romance, the newlyweds return to Waynesville, North Carolina. There, Serena and George clash with the latter's partner, Mr. Buchanan, who regards the young bride as an interloper in his relationship with George. Serena also discovers that George had conceived a child with a local servant girl named Rachel Hermann. Although George reassures Serena that the infant boy means nothing to him, she discovers otherwise after she suffers a miscarriage. Deadly antics follow as the Pembertons deal with legal threats and grow apart over George's illegitimate child.

When "SERENA" first reached the U.S. movie theaters, it sunk at the box office amidst negative reviews from the critics and fans of Rash's novel. I have never read the novel. But I have read its synopsis after seeing the movie. And I have also read the reviews. There seemed to be a mixed reaction to the novel, despite its success. But the reaction to the novel seemed a lot more positive than the reaction to the film. Many have criticized director Suzanne Bier and screenwriter Christopher Kyle's changes from the novel. Serena's point-of-view was reduced in the film. Bier and Kyle added a background in the timber business for the leading character. They removed an early scene featuring a clash between George and Rachel Hermann's father Abe (Harmon in the novel). They removed the Greek chorus of loggers and changed the ending. And you know what today's moviegoers and television viewers are like. If a movie or series is going to adapt a novel, these fans usually insist or demand no changes. This is a very unrealistic or dangerous attitude for any filmmaker or television producer to have. To produce a film or a television movie, series or miniseries takes a great deal of money. And a producer needs to consider so much - especially in creating an adaptation of a literary source.

There were some changes made by Bier and Kyle that did not bother me. I felt more than relieved that they had decided to drop that violent encounter between George Pemberton and Abe Hermann (Harmon) at the Waynesville train station. While reading about it, I felt that such a violent encounter happened too soon in the story and it struck me - personally - as ridiculously over-the-top. Perhaps other fans missed it. I did not. According to some criticism of Rash's novel, the Selena Pemberton character came off as a one-note monster with no real depth. Some have lobbied the same charge at George Pemberton. Since I have never read the novel, I do not know whether they are right or wrong. But I am grateful that the movie did portray both characters with some emotional depth. This was apparent in the couple's intense regard for one another and the emotional breakdown that occurred, following Serena's miscarriage. I also have no problems with Kyle's decision to add a background in lumber in Serena's back story. I thought her familiarity with a lumber camp gave credence to her ability to help George deal with the problems that sprang up within his camp. On the other hand, both Bier and Kyle managed to find time to focus on the Pembertons' willingness to exploit the natural beauty around them for business and George's penchant for hunting panthers. I also found the clash between the Pembertons' efforts to maintain their business in the Appalachian Mountains and the local sheriff's desire to preserve the surrounding forests for a national park rather interesting. I had no idea that the clash between those who wanted to exploit the land and those who wanted to preserve it stretched back that far.

I was surprised to learn that had been filmed in the Czech Republic and Denmark. However, looking into the background of the film's crew and cast members, I found this not surprising. With the exception of a few, most of them proved to be Europeans. I have no idea which Czech mountain range where "SERENA" was filmed, but I have to give kudos to cinematographer Morten Søborg for his rich and beautiful photography of the country. But thanks to Martin Kurel's art direction, Graeme Purdy's set decorations and Richard Bridgland's production designs did an admirable job of transporting audiences back to early Depression-era western North Carolina. As for the movie's costume designs, I thought Signe Sejlund did a top-notch job. Not only did she managed to re-create the fashions of that period (1929 to the early 1930s), she also took care to match the clothes according to the characters' personality, class and profession. 

I never read any of the reviews for "SERENA", so I have no idea how other critics felt about the cast's performances. When I first learned about the movie, many bloggers and journalists seemed amazed that Jennifer Lawrence would be cast in the role of the emotional and ruthless Serena Pemberton. Personally, I was not that amazed by the news. The actress has portrayed ruthless characters before and she certainly had no problems portraying Serena. I thought she did a top-notch job in capturing both the character's ruthlessness and the intense emotions that the latter harbored for her husband. There is one scene that truly demonstrated Lawrence's talent as an actress. And it occurred when Serena discovered that George had been secretly keeping an eye on his illegitimate son. I was impressed by how Lawrence took the character from surprise to a sense of betrayal and finally to sheer anger within seconds. Bradley Cooper, who had co-starred with Lawrence in two previous films, portrayed Serena's ruthless, yet passionate husband, George Pemberton. Cooper not only conveyed his character's businesslike ruthlessness, but also the latter's moral conflict over some of his actions. My only complaint is that I found his New England accent (his character is from Boston) slightly exaggerated.

"SERENA" featured solid performances from the supporting cast. Toby Jones did a good job in portraying the morally righteous sheriff, McDowell. Ana Ularu also gave a solid and warm performance as Rachel Hermann, the young woman with whom George had conceived a child, when he used her as a bed warmer. Sean Harris was very effective as the conniving Pemberton employee, Campbell. The movie also featured brief appearances from the likes of Bruce Davidson, Charity Wakefield, and Blake Ritson. But the best performances amongst the supporting cast came from David Dencik and Rhys Ifans. Dencik gave a surprisingly subtle performance as George's partner, Mr. Buchanan, who resented his partner's marriage to Serena and her increasing impact on their lumber business. In fact, Dencik's performance was so subtle, it left me wondering whether or not his character was secretly infatuated with George. Equally subtle was Rhys Ifans, who portrayed Pemberton employee-turned-Serena's henchman, Galloway. Ifans did an excellent job in infusing both Galloway's emotional ties to Serena and ruthless willingness to commit murder on her behalf.

Contrary to what many may believe, "SERENA" has its share of virtues. But it also has its share of flaws. One aspect of"SERENA" that I had a problem with surprisingly turned out to be the cast. Mind you, the cast featured first-rate actors. But I was not that impressed by the supporting cast's Southern accents that ranged from mediocre to terrible. I could blame the film makers for relying upon European (especially British performers). But this could have easily happened with a cast of American actors. Only two actors had decent (if not perfect) upper South accents - Rhys Ifans and Sean Harris. I have no idea how Bruce Davidson, one of the few Americans in the cast, dealt with an Appalachian accent. He barely had any lines. Another problem I had with the movie turned out to be the score written by Johan Soderovist. First of all, it seemed unsuited for the movie's Appalachian setting. Worst, Susanne Bier and the film's producer failed to utilize the score throughout most of the film. There were too many moments in the film where there seemed to be no score to support the narrative. 

At one point of the film, Kyle's screenplay seemed to throw logic out of the window. When George committed murder to prevent Sheriff McDowell and the Federal authorities from learning about his bribes, a Pemberton employee named Campbell who had witnessed the crime, blackmailed him for a promotion. Yet, later in the film, Campbell decided to tell McDowell about the murder and the bribes. The problem is that Kyle's screenplay never explained why Campbell had this change of heart. It never revealed why he had decided to bite the hand that fed him. And I have to agree with those who complained that the film did not focus upon Serena's point-of-view enough. The movie's title is "SERENA". Yet, most of the film - especially in the first half - seemed to be focused upon George's point-of-view. I have no idea why Bier and Kyle made these changes, but I feel that it nearly undermined the film's narrative.

My biggest gripe with "SERENA" proved to be the ending. If I must be honest, I hated it. I also thought that it undermined the Serena Pemberton character, transforming her into a weeping ninny who could not live without her husband. Kyle's screenplay should have adhered a lot closer to Rash's novel. I am aware that both Serena and George loved each other very much. But Serena struck me as the type of woman who would have reacted with anger against George's lies about his illegitimate baby, his emotional withdrawal and his attempt to strangle her. She reminded me of a younger, Depression-era version of the Victoria Grayson character from ABC's "REVENGE". Both women are both very passionate, yet ruthless at the same time. And if the television character was willing to resort to murder or any other kind of chicanery in retaliation to being betrayed, I believe that Serena was capable of the same, as well. Rash allowed Serena to react more violently against George for his betrayal, before sending her off to Brazil in order to start a lumber empire. Yet, both Rash and Kyle seemed determined to kill off Serena. Kyle did it by having Serena commit suicide by fire, after George was killed by a panther. I found this pathetic. Rash did it in his novel by having a mysterious stranger who bore a strong resemblance to George to kill her in Brazil. In other words, after surviving Serena's poisoning attempt and an attack by a panther, George managed to hunt her down in thirty years or so and kill her. I found this ludicrous and frankly, rather stupid. I would have been happier if Serena had killed George and left the U.S. to make her fortune in Brazil. She struck me as the type who would get away with her crimes. If the murderer in"CHINATOWN" could get away with his crimes, why not Serena Pemberton? I feel this would have made a more interesting ending.

It is a pity that "SERENA" failed at the box office. Unlike many critics, I do not view it as total crap. I have seen worse films that succeeded at the box office. I suspect that many had simply overreacted to the film's failure to live up to its original hype, considering the cast, the director and the novel upon which it was based. But it was not great. I regard"SERENA" as mediocre. The pity is that it could have been a lot better in the hands of a different director and screenwriter.

"BRIDGE OF SPIES" (2015) Photo Gallery

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Below are images from "BRIDGE OF SPIES", the 2015 account of the 1960 U-2 Incident. Directed by Steven Spielberg, the movie starred Tom Hanks: 



"BRIDGE OF SPIES" (2015) Photo Gallery

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Thursday, November 26, 2015

Favorite Films Set in the 1940s

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Below is a list of my favorite movies (so far) that are set in the 1940s: 


FAVORITE FILMS SET IN THE 1940s


1-Inglourious Basterds-a

1. "Inglourious Basterds" (2009) - Quentin Tarantino wrote and directed this Oscar nominated alternate history tale about two simultaneous plots to assassinate the Nazi High Command at a film premiere in German-occupied Paris. The movie starred Brad Pitt, Melanie Laurent and Oscar winner Christoph Waltz.



2-Captain America the First Avenger

2. "Captain America: The First Avenger" (2011) - Chris Evans made his first appearance in this exciting Marvel Cinematic Universe installment as the World War II comic book hero, Steve Rogers aka Captain America, who battles the Nazi-origin terrorist organization, HYDRA. Joe Johnston directed.



3-Bedknobs and Broomsticks

3. "Bedknobs and Broomsticks" (1971) - Angela Landsbury and David Tomilinson starred in this excellent Disney adaptation of Mary Norton's series of children's stories about three English children, evacuated to the countryside during the Blitz, who are taken in by a woman studying to become a witch in order to help the Allies fight the Nazis. Robert Stevenson directed.



4-The Public Eye

4. "The Public Eye" (1992) - Joe Pesci starred in this interesting neo-noir tale about a New York City photojournalist (shuttlebug) who stumbles across an illegal gas rationing scandal involving the mob, a Federal government official during the early years of World War II. Barbara Hershey and Stanley Tucci co-starred.



5-A Murder Is Announced

5. "A Murder Is Announced" (1985) - Joan Hickson starred in this 1985 adaptation of Agatha Christie's 1950 novel about Miss Jane Marple's investigation of a series of murders in an English village that began with a newspaper notice advertising a "murder party". Directed by David Giles, the movie co-starred John Castle.



6-Hope and Glory

6. "Hope and Glory" (1987) - John Boorman wrote and directed this fictionalized account of his childhood during the early years of World War II in England. Sarah Miles, David Hayman and Sebastian Rice-Edwards starred.



7-The Godfather

7. "The Godfather" (1972) - Francis Ford Coppola co-wrote and directed this Oscar winning adaptation of Mario Puzo's 1969 novel about the fictional leaders of a crime family in post-World War II New York City. Oscar winner Marlon Brando and Oscar nominee Al Pacino starred.



8-Valkyrie

8. "Valkyrie" (2008) - Bryan Singer directed this acclaimed account of the plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler in July 1944. Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy and Tom Wilkinson starred.



9-The Black Dahlia

9. "The Black Dahlia" (2006) - Brian DePalma directed this entertaining adaptation of James Ellroy's 1987 novel about the investigation of the infamous Black Dahlia case in 1947 Los Angeles. Josh Harnett, Scarlett Johansson, Aaron Eckhart and Hilary Swank starred.



10-Stalag 17

10. "Stalag 17" (1953) - Billy Wilder directed and co-wrote this well done adaptation of the 1951 Broadway play about a group of U.S. airmen in a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany, who begin to suspect that one of them might be an informant for the Nazis. Oscar winner William Holden starred.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

"THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" (1981) Review

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"THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" (1981) Review

Back in early 1981, ABC Television aired a miniseries about the lives of an Anglo-Irish immigrant family called "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA". Starring Pierce Brosnan and Kate Mulgrew, the miniseries aired in three parts and was marketed as the Irish-American version of the 1977 miniseries, "ROOTS"

"The Irish-American version of "ROOTS"? Hmmmm . . . I do not know if that similarity genuinely works. Yes, both miniseries focused upon the beginning of a family line in the United States. Both are family sagas set before the 20th century. But the differences between the two productions are so obvious that I found it hard to accept this comparison. The Kunta Kinte character from "ROOTS" was kidnapped from his homeland and dragged into forced labor in the Americas. Worse, he died as a slave. The Rory O'Manion character was forced to flee his Ireland homeland from British oppression. And despite facing American bigotry against Irish immigrants, he was able to become a well-respected businessman by the end of the series. "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" focused upon one generation - Rory, his sister Deidre and their loved ones - within a period of two decades or so. As for "ROOTS", it focused upon four to five generations for at least ten to eleven decades.

Part One of "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA"begins in 1845 Ireland. This episode focused upon the intoduction of the O'Manion family and their struggles during the Great Famine. Both Rory and his twin brother, Padric O'Manion, are hired by a newly arrived English landlord named Harry Clement to work on the latter's estate. Rory meets and falls in love with Mr. Clement's daughter and younger offspring, Rachel. Rory's sister Deidre meets and falls in love with Rachel's older brother, a British Army officer named David. Both couples face considerable strain, due to nationality and class. Rory's participation in the Young Ireland not only places considerable strain on his romance with Rachel, but also Deidre's relationship with David. Worse, his political activism leads to a tragic parting between him and Padric. Rory is eventually forced to flee Ireland for the United States.

Part Two begins at least two to three years following the events of Part One. Rory is reunited with Rachel, who has moved to Philadelphia following the death of her father. She ends up living with with her aunt Charlotte Kent and the latter's husband, a powder mill owner named James Kent. Rachel convinces her uncle to hire Rory as an employee. The young couple also become acquainted with a banker named Caleb Staunton, who becomes impressed by Rory's ambition and business acumen. Caleb also ends up falling in love with Deidre, who finally arrives in the United States in the wake of a family tragedy involving the youngest O'Manion sibling. And Rachel receives disturbing news about her brother David . . . news that ends up having a major impact on Deidre's future. Part Three mainly focused on the years following the end of the U.S. Civil War and Rory's attempt to keep the Kent Powder Works that he has purchased with two partners (Caleb and David). Rory's business dealings also clash with his resumed interest in his political activism regarding Ireland. And while Deidre finds herself struggling with Caleb's jealousy of her past relationship with David, Rory endangers both his marriage and friendship with a fellow immigrant with a dangerous affair.

When I first saw "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" when I was a kid, I was pretty impressed with it. Even back then, I was a literary and history nut with a weakness for family sagas. And this miniseries seemed to fulfill my desire for those stories to a "T". A recent viewing of the production made me realize that I still found it very satisfying. I would not regard "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" on the same level as a good number of historical television dramas I have seen over the following years. But I feel that Agnes Nixon and Rosemary Anne Sisson created a solid television drama that managed to hold up very well after three decades. As I had pointed out earlier, "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" focused only on one generation . . . namely the one that featured Rory O'Manion, his sister Deidre, his twin brother Padric O'Manion, the youngest sibling who might or might not be the missing Sean O'Manion, Rachel Clements and her brother David. Nixon and Sisson did a solid job of balancing the experiences of the main characters' experiences. 

Part One focused upon the establishment of the romances between the O'Manion and the Clement siblings, along with the events that led to Rory's flight from Ireland. Part Two focused not only on the reunions and problems of the two romantic couples, but also on Rory's financial and professional rise in the United States. And Part Three focused on Rory and Deidre's possible reunion with a young man they believe to be their missing brother Sean; the events that led to the culmination of the love triangle between Deidre, David and Caleb; Rory's last hurrah with the movement to free Ireland from British rule; and the events that led to the birth of a new generation in the now Manion family. Frankly, I thought they balanced the miniseries' narratives very well. More importantly, the story arcs featured first-rate direction by both Charles S. Dubin and Joseph Sargent; along with solid writing by Nixon and Sisson . . . with the exception of one story arc.

The one story arc that proved to be problematic for me was Rory and Rachel's efforts to have children. I had no problem with Rachel's miscarriage near the end of Part Two. It was basically used as a plot device to reconcile her with Rory and Deidre, who were angry about the lie she told about David's fate in India. The lie encouraged Deidre to go ahead and marry Caleb Staunton, who was planning to form a partnership with Rory over a powder sale. But Part Three opened with Rachel suffering another miscarriage during the Civil War (she had suffered other miscarriages in the period between the two episodes). This latest miscarriage eventually led Rory to have an affair with another woman, in order to prevent himself from having sex with Rachel and impregnating her. And with whom does he have this affair? With the unmarried daughter of one of his closest friends and colleagues. Is this bat-shit crazy or what? I will give kudos to Rory being more concerned with his wife's health than the idea of conceiving an heir. But I found this story arc just plain stupid and the main reason why Part Three is my least favorite episode. I find it odd that a good number of people seemed dismissive of the Deidre-David-Caleb love triangle. Yet, no one complained about this idiotic story arc about Rory and Rachel's marriage. And it ended on a note that to this day, I still detest.

"THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" was filmed in Ireland and England (one or two scenes). And it showed. Part One benefited from the Irish locations . . . especially since it was that episode was set in Ireland. But once the story shifted to the United States, the locations did not serve the setting very well. I suppose the miniseries' producers called themselves trying to save money on the production. If so, they could have shot the film in the United States or Canada. Unless filming in Ireland was considered cheap back in the early 1980s. "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" featured three cinematographers - Lamar Boren, Héctor R. Figueroa and Frank Watts. I found this rather odd for a television miniseries that only featured three episodes. And yet, this would explain the inconsistent style of photography for the production. The scenes ranged from bright and colorful - especially in Part Two - to dark and rather depressing. And from what I have seen, the dark photography DID NOT serve any particular scene, aside from those featuring the interior of the O'Manions' dank hovel in Part One. I also have mixed feelings regarding the costumes designed by Barbara Lane. The costumes she designed especially for Kate Mulgrew, Linda Purl, Kathleen Beller and Barbara Parkins in Episodes Two and Three were beautiful and excellent examples of women's fashion between the 1840s and the 1860s. However, I had a problem with Mulgew's costumes in Part One. They looked as if they came straight from a costume warehouse in Hollywood. And they seemed a bit of a come down for a character that was supposed to be the daughter of a well-to-do English landowner.

A good number of the reviews I have read for "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" did not seem that impressed by the supporting cast. Well, I feel differently. I thought the three-part miniseries was blessed by excellent performances - not only from the leads Pierce Brosnan and Kate Mulgrew - but also the supporting players. I was very impressed by Linda Purl's command of an Irish accent and the amazing way that she conveyed both the quiet and demure side of Deidre O'Manion, along with the character's sharp temper and strong will. Simon MacCorkindale's portrayal of young British officer, David Clements, made it very easy for me to see why Deidre had no problems with falling in love with his character. MacCorkindale gave a very passionate, yet charming performance. David Soul's performance as Caleb Staunton struck me as very interesting, complex and also very appealing. Despite his Caleb being a more introverted man, Soul did an excellent job in making it clear why Deidre would find him attractive as a mate . . . and why Rory regarded him as a potential business partner. Steve Forrest was very interesting as Rachel's uncle-by-marriage, James Kent. Forrest did an excellent job in conveying Kent's respectable facade and the chaotic emotions he felt toward his niece. His attempt to "seduce" his niece was a squirm worthy moment. Barbara Parkins gave a very competent performance as Rachel's chilly aunt Charlotte. Yet, Parkins managed to show the hot jealousy toward Rachel, underneath the chilly facade. Anthony Quayle made his presence known as the temperamental English landowner and magistrate, Lord Montgomery. There were moments when Quayle seemed a bit over-the-top The movie also boasted some first-class performances from Kathleen Beller, Peter Gilmore, Simon Rouse, Hurd Hatfield, Jim Culleton and Tom Jordan.

"THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" marked Pierce Brosnan's first role in an American production. And he really took it to the max as the fiery political immigrant, Rory O'Manion. Brosnan's performance is probably one of the most energetic he has given throughout his career. That is due, of course, to the hot-tempered and obsessive nature of his character. But as much as I admired Brosnan's performance, I must admit there were times when I found the Rory O'Manion character a bit hard to like. He struck me as unrelentingly obsessed with his political activities against the English and too self-righteous for me to relate with. Equally fiery was Kate Mulgrew, who portrayed Rory's English wife, Rachel. Mulgrew did a superb job in portraying Rachel's strong, romantic nature; her intelligence and talent for manipulation. Also, both she and Brosnan made such a fiery screen team that they were almost resembled a bonfire. Yet, my vote for the best performance in the miniseries would have gone to Nicholas Hammond, who had the difficulty of portraying two members of the O'Manion family (allegedly). In Part One, Hammond gave a complex and skillful performance as Rory's non-identical twin brother, Padric O'Manion, whose quiet and pacifist nature led to conflict and great tragedy within the family. And in Part Three, he gave another superb performance as a rowdy and independent-minded ex-Confederate soldier who may or may not be Rory and Deidre's missing younger brother, Sean. I was impressed by how Hammond conveyed Sean's blunt personality and inner conflict over the possibility of finally discovering his family and retaining his independence.

Overall, "THE MANIONS OF AMERICA" is a pretty solid production that did a first-rate job in presenting a family saga that began in Ireland and ended in the United States during the mid 19th century. Yes, the miniseries suffered from inconsistent photography that ranged from colorful to unnecessarily dark. And the subplot regarding the main protagonists' marriage in the third episode struck me as particularly ridiculous. But I still managed to enjoy the production as a whole and regard it as a fine example of what both Pierce Brosnan and Kate Mulgrew were capable during the early stages of their careers.