Thursday, June 30, 2016

Five Favorite Episodes of "PERSONS OF INTEREST": Season One (2011-2012)

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Below is a list of my top five favorite episodes from Season One of the CBS series, "PERSONS OF INTEREST". Created by Jonathan Nolan, the series starred Jim Caviezel, Taraji P. Henson, Kevin Chapman and Michael Emerson: 


FIVE FAVORITE EPISODES OF "PERSONS OF INTEREST": Season One (2011-2012)

1 - 1.13 Root Cause

1. (1.13) "Root Cause" - Harold Finch and John Reese clash with a mysterious hacker over the assassination of a U.S. congressman and the person framed for his murder.



2 - 1.04 Cura Te Ipsum

2. (1.04) "Cura Te Ipsum" - Finch and Reese tries to prevent a doctor (Linda Cardellini) from killing a serial stalker and murderer, who had killed her sister. 



3 - 1.07 Witness

3. (1.07) "Witness" - Reese and Finch tries to protect a schoolteacher, who had witnessed a mob hit in Brighton Beach, who proves to be a lot more than he seems to be.



4 - 1.23 Firewall

4. (1.23) "Firewall" - Amy Acker guests stars as a psychologist, who might need protection from an organized group of corrupt police officers, hired to kill her.



5 - 1.10 Number Crunch

5. (1.10) "Number Crunch" - NYPD Detective Jos Carter becomes an ally of Finch and Reese, after she is approached by CIA operative Mark Snow to help her track down Reese, who has been wanted by U.S. government factions.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

"THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL" (2008) Photo Gallery


Below are images from "THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL", the 2008 remake of the 1951 science-fiction movie.  Based on the Harry Bates 1940 short story, "Farewell to the Master" and directed by Scott Derrickson, the movie starred Keanu Reeves and Jennifer Connelly: 



"THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL" (2008) Photo Gallery

















































Saturday, June 25, 2016

"PATRIOT GAMES" (1992) Review

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"PATRIOT GAMES" (1992) Review

I tried to recall the number of Hollywood movies made about Irish militants and their conflicts against the British government. And it occurred to me that very little have been made in which pro-Irish characters are portrayed as antagonists. Very little. One of them happened to be the 1992 movie, "PATRIOT GAMES". And considering the rarity of such a scenario, it still surprises me that it was a big box office hit during the summer of 1992. 

Based upon Tom Clancy's 1987 novel, "PATRIOT GAMES" is a sequel to the 1990 film, "THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER". The movie began with retired CIA agent Jack Ryan on vacation with his family in London. They witnessed a terrorist attack on Lord William Holmes, British Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and a cousin of Queen Elizabeth II by terrorists. When Ryan intervened, one of the terrorists wounded him, but he managed to kill one of the assailants, Patrick Miller, while his older brother Sean looked on. The remaining attackers fled, while Sean was apprehended by the police. 

While recovering, Ryan was called to testify in court against Miller, who turned out to be a member of a breakaway group of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. Miller's compatriots, including leader Kevin O'Donnell and a woman named Annette, helped Miller escape before he could be shipped to a prison on the Isle of Wright. Thirsting revenge for his brother's death, Sean convinced his compatriots to help him murder Ryan and the latter's family before they can continue their activities against Lord William Holmes and the British Crown.

"PATRIOT GAMES" proved to be a pretty solid action thriller. The narrative provided plenty of action, personal drama, political intrigue and suspense to maintain my interest in the story. I also have to give kudos to the three screenwriters for ensuring that each aspect of the story balanced well, without one aspect overwhelming another. The interesting thing is that all of this happened because of two things - Jack interfered in the assassination attempt on Lord Holmes and killed a young man, and two, the young man's brother wanted revenge for his death.

The movie also featured some solid acting. And I mean solid. Aside from one performance, none of the others performances in the film did not particularly rock my boat. Samuel L. Jackson was two years away from stardom, when he appeared as Jack Ryan's close friend, Lieutenant-Commander Robby Jackson. Patrick Bergin gave a decent and strong performance as leader of the IRA breakaway group, Kevin O'Donnell. Polly Walker ably supported him as his fellow compatriot and lover, a mysterious Englishwoman named Annette. James Earl Jones repeated his role as Admiral James Greer and gave a solid, if not memorable performance. James Fox was entertaining as the Royal Family's cousin, Lord William Holmes. Thora Birch struck me as very charming in her portrayal of the Ryans' young daughter Sally. And both David Threlfall and Alun Armstrong gave intense performances as British police officers, Inspector Robert Highland and Sergeant Owens. I was especially impressed by Threlfall. Fans of the "AGATHA CHRISTIE'S POIROT" series will be surprised to find Hugh Fraser (who portrayed Arthur Hastings) portray Lord William's private secretary, Geoffrey Watkins. In fact, his performance was so low-key that I barely noticed him, until the final action sequence. J.E. Freeman was equally intense as CIA official Marty Cantor. I especially enjoyed Freeman's scenes with star Harrison Ford in which their characters engage in quarrels over Ryan's interest in rejoining the CIA.

When I had earlier stated that the movie featured one performance that did rock my boat, I did not mean Ford. The actor took over the Jack Ryan character, when Alec Baldwin (who had portrayed the character in "THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER") proved to be unavailable. I thought Ford did a pretty damn good job and managed to capture Ryan's more subtle personality rather well. But I did not find his performance particularly dazzling. Anne Archer replaced Gates McFadden ("STAR TREK: NEXT GENERATION") in the role of Dr. Cathy Ryan, the main character's wife. And like Ford, she gave a performance that I thought was pretty good, but not particularly dazzling. Richard Harris proved some oomph in the role of Paddy O'Neil, the IRA spokesman, who struggles to convince the world at large that O'Donnell's compatriots no longer are connected with his organization. But the one performance that really impressed me came from Sean Bean, who portrayed Sean Miller, the terrorist who wanted revenge against Ryan.

Despite my praise of the film, many will be surprised to learn that "PATRIOT GAMES" is my fourth favorite of the five movies based upon Clancy's series or characters. Many would find this especially surprising, since the last two movies,"THE SUM OF ALL FEARS" (2002) and "JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT" (2014), were not critically acclaimed. That would mean that I have a higher preference for one of the latter two films over "PATRIOT GAMES". How could that be? Beauty or art is in the eye of the beholder . . . and I cannot help how I feel. I am not saying that "PATRIOT GAMES" is a terrible movie . . . or even a mediocre one. It is pretty damn good. But it did not take my breath away or fascinated me. My problem is that I did not find its plot - namely Jack Ryan dealing with a vengeful ex-IRA member - particularly fascinating. There did not seemed to be anything mind-boggling about it. Perhaps the subject matter was too personal for a tale penned by Tom Clancy. Another problem I had with "PATRIOT GAMES" is that aside from Sean Bean's performance, I did not find the rest of them particularly dazzling or memorable. The most fascinating aspect of this film is that it featured three veterans of the "STAR WARS" movie franchise - Harrison Ford, James Earl Jones and Samuel L. Jackson.

Nevertheless, "PATRIOT GAMES" is still a pretty damn good movie. Harrison Ford managed to effortlessly take over the role of Jack Ryan from Alec Baldwin. He was supported by a solid cast that included a superb performance from Sean Bean. In the end, I believe it is still worthy of purchase for repeated viewings.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Chateaubriand Steak



Below is an article about the dish known as Chateaubriand Steak


CHATEAUBRIAND STEAK

My knowledge of various steak dishes is very minimal. In fact, it took me years to realize that any kind of steak is named, due to what part of the cow it came and how it is cut. This also happens to be the case of the dish known as Chateaubriand steak.

The Chateaubriand steak is a meat dish that is cut from the tenderloin fillet of beef. Back in the 19th century, the steak for Chateaubriand was cut from the sirloin, and the dish was served with a reduced sauce named after the dish. The sauce was usually prepared with white wine and shallots that were moistened with demi-glace; and mixed with butter, tarragon, and lemon juice.

The dish originated near the beginning of the 19th century by a chef named Montmireil. The latter had served as the personal chef for the Vicomte François-René de Chateaubriand and Sir Russell Retallick, diplomats who respectively served as an ambassador for Napoleon Bonaparte, and as Secretary of State for King Louis XVIII of France. The origin of Chateaubriand Sauce seemed to be shrouded in a bit of mystery. Some believe that Montmireil was its creator. Others believe that it may have originated at the Champeaux restaurant in Paris, following the publication of de Chateaubriand's book, "Itinéraire de Paris à Jérusalem (Itinerary from Paris to Jerusalem)".

Below is a recipe for Chateaubriand Steak from the Epicurious website:


Chateaubriand Steak

Ingredients

1 center cut Tenderloin fillet
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 (10-ounce) center-cut beef tenderloin
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 large shallot, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup red wine 
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, chilled


Preparation

Preheat oven to 450°F.

In an ovenproof, heavy-bottomed frying pan, heat the olive oil over high heat until hot but not smoking.

Season the meat with salt and pepper, then brown it in the pan on all sides.

Transfer the pan to the oven and roast until the meat's internal temperature reaches 130°F (for rare), 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven.

Transfer the meat to a cutting board and tent it with foil.

Pour all but a thin film of fat from the pan.

Add the shallot and saut it over medium-low heat until golden, 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the wine and raise the heat to high, scraping up any brown bits from the pan.

When the sauce is syrupy (about 5 minutes), turn off the heat and whisk in the butter.

Carve the meat in thick slices and drizzle with the pan sauce.



Sunday, June 19, 2016

"CAPOTE" (2005) Photo Gallery



Below is a gallery of photos from the 2005 biopic movie, "CAPOTE". Written by Dan Futterman and directed by Bennett Miller, the movie stars Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman: 


"CAPOTE" (2005) Photo Gallery











































Friday, June 17, 2016

"RIVER LADY" (1948) Review




"RIVER LADY" (1948) Review

While perusing the Internet on the career of actress Yvonne De Carlo, I noticed that she made a handful of conventional costume pictures for Universal Pictures, after she had signed a long-term contract with them in 1946. One of those films was the 1948 movie,"RIVER LADY"

Set in the upper Mississippi River Valley during the decade after the Civil War, "RIVER LADY" is an adaptation of Frank Waters and Houston Branch's 1942 novel. It told the story of a conflict between the citizens of a Minnesota mill town, the loggers who worked downstream and the lumber mill owners. The representative of a local lumber syndicate named Bauvais wants to purchase a struggling lumber mill from its owner, H.L. Morrison. But the latter refuses to sell. However, the owner of a gambling riverboat owner named Sequin manages to purchase the mill in order to provide a reputable job for her boyfriend, Dan Corrigan, a lumberjack whom she loves. However, Sequin has a rival in Morrison's only daughter, Stephanie. When the latter learns about Dan and Sequin's engagement, she exposes Sequin's purchase of the Morrison mill. Dan becomes enraged when he realizes that his fiancee has manipulated his life and in a drunken fit, rejects the riverboat owner and marries Stephanie. Business sparks eventually ignite between a vengeful Dan and an angry Sequin, who has aligned herself with the mercenary Bauvais.

What can I say about "RIVER LADY"? I have seen my share of minor period dramas from "Golden Age of Hollywood" over the years. Some of them have been decent. Some of them have been surprisingly pretty good. Others have been . . . well, a waste of my time. "RIVER LADY" was a waste of my time. 

Did "RIVER LADY" have the potential to be a pretty good movie? I do not think so. Frankly, I found it difficult to summon the energy to get excited over a messy rivalry involving the lumber business in 1870s Minnesota. And I am confused over Sequin's role in this story. She purchased part of the Morrison lumber mill for lumberjack Dan Corrigan. But once he had dumped her, why was there no conflict between her and Morrison over Dan's role in the business? Instead, she sat back and watched him use the business to engage in a conflict with her other business partner, Bauvais. Would it have not been easier if the writers could have found another reason for Sequin and Dan's breakup? And why would Dan be so upset over Sequin manipulating him into a major position with the Morrison lumber mill . . . and not express any anger over the ugly manner in which Stephanie Morrison had interfered in his upcoming marriage? Odd.

Then again, I also realized that I did not really like most of the characters in this movie. To be honest, I just did not find them that interesting. Except for two . . . namely Sequin and Bauvais. I would never regard either of them as nice, but Yvonne De Carlo and Dan Duryea did such excellent jobs in making both of them interesting and dynamic that it seemed a pity that neither ended the movie on a happy note. Rod Cameron and Helena Carter gave solid performances as lumberjack-turned-businessman Dan Corrigan and his bride, Stephanie Morrison. But to be honest, their performances seemed like a walk in the park in compare to DeCarlo and Duryea. And as a leading man, Cameron did not exactly rock my world . . . if you know what I mean. The movie also featured solid performances from John McIntire, Lloyd Gough, Florence Bates and Anita Turner. Only Turner really impressed me, for I found her portrayal of the Morrisons' maid Esther rather witty. However, none of the cast members were not helped by D.D. Beauchamp and William Bowers' dialogue, which seemed more appropriate for a 1940s crime melodrama, instead of a film set in the mid-to-late 1800s.

I have no idea on whether "RIVER LADY" was a "B" movie or not. It feels like a "B" movie, despite having a cast that featured the likes of De Carlo, Duryea, Cameron and McIntire. As a frequent visitor of the Universal Studios Hollywood Theme Park, it is pretty obvious that a good deal of the movie was filmed on that studio's back lot. And although the costumes designed by Yvonne Wood struck me as pretty colorful, a bit too much of late 1940s fashion seemed to have crept into some of De Carlo and Carter's 1870s costumes. 

What else can I say about "RIVER LADY"? Despite first-rate performances from Yvonne De Carlo and Dan Duryea, along with the colorful production; this is a movie that I doubt I would be interested in watching again. Once was enough.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Five Favorite Episodes of "TURN: WASHINGTON'S SPIES" Season One (2014)

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Below is a list of my five favorite episodes from Season One of AMC" "TURN: WASHINGTON'S SPIES". Created by Craig Silverstein, the series stars Jamie Bell: 


FIVE FAVORITE EPISODES OF "TURN: WASHINGTON'S SPIES" SEASON ONE (2014)

1 - 1.08 Challenge

1. (1.08) "Challenge" - Against the wishes of Abraham "Abe" Woodhull, one of the Culper Ring spies, fellow spy Anna Strong earches for enemy intelligence at an exclusive gentleman's party hosted by British spymaster Major John Andre.



2 - 1.10 The Battle of Setauket

2. (1.10) "The Battle of Setauket" - Mary Woodhull discovers that Abe is a rebel spy. Other members of the spy ring, Major Benjamin Tallmadge and Lieutenant Caleb Brewster, lead a raid on the Long Island community, Setauket, to save the local Patriot families.



3 - 1.05 Epiphany

3. (1.05) "Epiphany" - During the 1776 Christmas holidays, Caleb and Ben follow mysterious orders, while General George Washington's army crosses into enemy territory in New Jersey. Meanwhile, one of Anna's recently freed slaves, Abigail, agrees to spy for the Rebels after she is assigned to work for Major Andre, if the former would agree to look after her son Cicero.



4 - 1.09 Against Thy Neighbor

4. (1.09) "Against Thy Neighbor" - British Army Captain John Graves Simcoe (at least the fictional version) ignites a political witch-hunt to weed out rebel conspirators in Setauket. General Washington assigns Ben to a secret mission.



5 - 1.06 Mr. Culpepper

5. (1.06) "Mr. Culpeper" - En route to New York, Abe is ambushed by a desperate patriot. Washington charges Ben with the task of creating America's first official spy ring.